Skip to main content

William Henry Jackson Chromolithographs

 Collection
Identifier: MS 193
The collection consists of 47 Chromolithographs (color lithographs) produced by the Detroit Photographic Co. from photographs by William Henry Jackson, circa 1900. The images are primarily landscapes in Colorado, California, New Mexico, Mexico, and Quebec, Canada.

Dates

  • 1898-1902

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

Collection is open for research.

Extent

0.25 Linear feet

Biographical / Historical

William Henry Jackson was a painter, geological survey photographer and explorer famous for his images of the American West. He was born in Keeseville, New York in 1843 and showed an aptitude for painting from a young age. Jackson volunteered for the 12th Vermont Infantry of the Union Army in 1862. He sketched camp life and mapped the countryside. After the war, he returned to painting. His work evenually led him west in 1866, where he worked for Union Pacific, American geologist Ferdinand Hayden, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Jackson's photographs played an important role in convincing Congress to establish Yellowstone National Park in 1872. Jackson continued to photograph the west, and eventually settled in Denver, Colorado, where he worked as a commercial landscape photographer and published his photographs as postcards.

Chromolithography is a method for making multi-color prints. It stemmed from the process of lithography and is often referred to as photochrome. Colorized images are produced from black-and-white phtographic negatives by the transfer of the negative onto a lithographic printing plates.

Arrangement

Arranged in alphabetical order by name of image location.

Physical Location

Vault: FE4

Provenance

Donated to the Art Galleries at TCU in December 2016.

Repository Details

Part of the Archives and Special Collections, Mary Couts Burnett Library Repository

Contact:
TCU Box 298400
2800 S. University Drive
Fort Worth, Texas 76129-0001
Fort Worth Texas 76129
(817) 257-7108
(817) 257-7282 (Fax)